The Slow Sinister Creep of Desertification — Healed With Animals Properly Grazed

Creeping desertification in Kenya — wide leaf weeds, bare ground, wilted grasses

This is what the slow, sinister creep of desertification and the fix with animals looks like. On the desertification side: wide spaces between plants — weeds proliferating — bare capped ground — wilted grasses, etc. On the restoration side: bunched, multi-species herding following a grazing plan made for maximum ecological impact — to get the animals “to the right place, at the right time, for the right reason.”

Properly herded livestock — denser herds, ecologically oriented grazing plan

Pictured here are three examples of the spread of desertification; one photo of hero practitioner, Dalmas Tiampati of the Maasai in Kenya, with his bunched herd of cows and goats; and one photo of a healthy pasture, still benefitting from when it was a corral with 1000+ animals in the early to mid 1980s, nearly 40 years ago. Yes, after almost 40 years, the plot that had been the corral of 1000+ animals is still clearly in better shape than the surrounding land. It has more grasses, better cover, and less weeds. When Western academia understands what the migratory pastoral peoples have known for centuries — that animals are essential for soil — then we’ll have a chance at reversing desertification and global warming.

Yes, after nearly 40 years, the plot that had been the corral of 1000+ animals, is still clearly in better shape than the surrounding land.

Healthy pasture 40 years after the location of a corral with 1000+ animals

As long as animals are shamed, however, or there is talk of “less animals,” or “less meat,” then we are guaranteed to see continued desertification, runaway global warming, and the loss of all pastoral cultures including their indigenous knowledge of land stewardship. Soil4Climate supports the regenerative herding operation in Kenya and the generous support of our members has helped make it so. We thank you. If you would like to make a donation to Soil4Climate so we can continue to support this work, please do so on our website, where you can also purchase one of our awesome hats. They’re the only fashion statement you’ll ever need to make. ;-) Thank you. — Seth

www.soil4climate.org

When Western academia understands what the migratory pastoral peoples have known for centuries — that animals are essential for soil — then we’ll have a chance at reversing desertification and global warming.

All photos by Seth Itzkan in Kenya, December 2019

Desertification

Co-Founder, Soil4Climate Inc.